Author Topic: Starting a Farm  (Read 246 times)

Ed

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Starting a Farm
« on: May 18, 2017, 06:57:12 PM »
United States Department of Agriculture  (USDA)
Economic Research Service

New farmers, start here.
Agriculture is full of exciting and rewarding opportunities. Farming is a tough job, but at the heart of it all, you'll see a vibrant community contributing to the future of our nation's health and food security.

USDA Home Page : Restructuring  the USDA

https://www.usda.gov
New Farmers, Start Here:
https://newfarmers.usda.gov/new-farmers
Additional Topics
https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/
« Last Edit: May 18, 2017, 07:01:50 PM by Ed »

Ed

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Farmland Bargains
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2017, 01:56:16 PM »
Have a look at the first paragraph of this article by Gene Johnston, titled,
“Successful Farming”  at Agriculture.com

Farm Land Bargains?
By Gene Johnston
3/4/2014

http://www.agriculture.com/farm-management/real-estate/land/americas-best-farml-bargains_301-ar42184

Farmland bargains.
Sounds like a joke, right? Is there any farmland today that sells at a bargain price?
Absolutely. It may not be next door or even in your own state, but there are some good investments out there and crops to grow that will return enough cash to make a land payment.
About a year ago, we heard of farmland in north Missouri -- just south of the prime Corn Belt -- that sold for $1,400 an acre. Considering that the entire state of Iowa now averages over $8,000 an acre (latest USDA farmland report), that struck us like a bargain, without even knowing what it looked like or its productive potential.
That made us wonder: Could it pay for itself in crop returns? Where else could you find farmland like that? If you borrowed every penny of the purchase price (which, of course, no bank would let you do), could it generate the income to make the annual land payment?
So, we went shopping. As it turns out, the Missouri land will pay for itself with good management and an annual crop of grass and stocker calves. A Wisconsin irrigated farm will pay for itself with a good potato crop. In Oregon, it’s a grass seed crop. 
(Click on the Link to Read More.)
http://www.agriculture.com/farm-management/real-estate/land/americas-best-farml-bargains_301-ar42184