Author Topic: Monsanto's Controversial Dicamba  (Read 42 times)


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Monsanto's Controversial Dicamba
« on: November 14, 2017, 08:34:42 PM »
Food for Thought

How Monsanto And Scofflaw Farmers Hurt Soybeans In Arkansas
August 1, 2016  7:00 AM ET
Dan Charles
From the article:
When Tom Barber, a scientist at the University of Arkansas who studies weeds, drives the country roads of eastern Arkansas this summer, his trained eye can spot the damage: soybean leaves contorted into cup-like shapes.
He's seeing it in field after field. Similar damage is turning up in Tennessee and in the "boot-heel" region of Missouri. Tens of thousands of acres are affected.
This is no natural phenomenon of weather or disease. It's almost certainly the result of a crime. The disfigured leaves are evidence that a neighboring farmer sprayed a herbicide called dicamba, probably in violation of the law.
Dicamba has been around for decades, and it is notorious for a couple of things: It vaporizes quickly and blows with the wind. And it's especially toxic to soybeans, even at ridiculously low concentrations
Damage from drifting pesticides isn't unfamiliar to farmers. But the reason for this year's plague of dicamba damage is unprecedented. "I've never seen anything like this before," says Bob Scott, a weed specialist from the University of Arkansas. "This is a unique situation that Monsanto created.

These soybean leaves show evidence of damage from dicamba. It could cut the the harvest by 10 to 30 percent. (Courtesy of the University of Arkansas)

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« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 08:42:06 PM by Ed »